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Studies Suggest This Drink May Be Slow The Aging Process

Studies Suggest This Drink May Be Slow The Aging Process

The post Studies Suggest This Drink May Be Slow The Aging Process by Caleb Naysmith appeared first on Benzinga. Visit Benzinga to get more great content like this.

A recent study conducted on mice, monkeys and worms indicates that taurine, an amino acid commonly found in energy drinks and other foods, may hold the key to living longer, healthier lives. Researchers discovered that a high daily dose of taurine helped delay death and mitigate the effects of aging in the animals.

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Because of the promising findings in animal studies, scientists are now pushing for a large-scale clinical trial to assess the potential benefits of taurine supplementation in slowing down the aging process and promoting better health.

The study revealed a significant decline in taurine levels as the animals aged. But when taurine levels were replenished to more youthful levels, the health of mice and monkeys improved, and the lifespan of mice was extended. 

Along with the potential benefits of taurine, another drink offers some promising hope for brain health. While they don’t claim to prevent aging, startups like TruBrain have capitalized on these cognitive boost and health trends. Their formulas are specifically designed to safely modulate blood flow and oxygen to the brain, resulting in increased oxygen and glucose delivery to neurons. This enhances the brain’s plasticity, or its ability to form new connections. 

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The implications for humans are still unclear, as are the potential risks associated with the required high doses. Nevertheless, researchers believe that the existing evidence is strong enough to warrant further investigation, especially considering that taurine is naturally present in the body and is already used as a supplement at lower doses.

“Taurine abundance declines with age and reversal of this decline makes animals live longer and healthier lives. At the end of the day, these findings should be relevant to humans,” said Vijay Yadav, who led the research at Columbia University. 

Henning Wackerhage, a professor at the Technical University of Munich, supported the call for a human trial and explained, “It will probably be very difficult to look at whether they live longer, but at least we can check if they live healthier for longer, and that, of course, is the goal for medicine.”

The initial focus on taurine as a potential driver of the aging process began in 2012 when researchers observed a significant decrease in taurine levels with age in mice, monkeys and humans. By age 60, the taurine levels in an average person drop to one-third of those seen in 5-year-olds.

Further tests were conducted on middle-aged mice, which received additional taurine supplementation. The results showed improved health and a more youthful appearance compared to the control group. 

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Taurine supplementation positively impacted various aspects of aging, including bone density, muscle strength, memory and immune system function. The lifespan of mice increased by an average of 10% for males and 12% for females, equivalent to an additional three to four months or around seven to eight human years. For humans, a similar dose would range from 3 grams to 6 grams per day.

In a separate six-month trial involving middle-aged macaques, daily taurine supplementation appeared to prevent weight gain, lower blood glucose levels, improve bone density and enhance the immune system.

Additional evidence from the analysis of medical data from over 12,000 Europeans 60 and older suggested that higher taurine levels were associated with a lower incidence of obesity, Type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and inflammation. The researchers also noted that engaging in intense exercise increased taurine levels.

While the scientists refrain from recommending increased taurine intake without further research, they express eagerness to conduct a human intervention study to shed more light on the potential benefits and risks of taurine supplementation.

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The post Studies Suggest This Drink May Be Slow The Aging Process by Caleb Naysmith appeared first on Benzinga. Visit Benzinga to get more great content like this.

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